• Help Us Find 33 Years of YWW Alumni! Take 17 seconds to fill out this form and help us along!

Before the founding in 1982 of the Young Writers Workshop at the University of Virginia, residential programs for young creative writers didn’t exist.

From the Blog

The Junk Drawer Discovery

Imagine someone’s junk drawer, that place where you accumulate weird stuff: paperclips and garden hose o-rings, dead highlighters and the fake money your junior high gave out for good behavior. To do this, you need to first imagine a scenario where one character must search through another person’s belongings, including the junk drawer.

Help Us Find 33 Years of YWW Alumni!

There are so many incredible things about The Young Writers Workshop: the friendships, the writing breakthroughs, the wild applause—even the 2011 demolition of Tuttle (that, we remind you, had no air conditioning). But perhaps one of YWW’s most amazing feats is that it has created this large and lasting community before the Internet age began. How did we even do it?

As the program enters its “thirty-something” years, it’s growing nostalgic. We want to know where our thousands of amazing alums are now—especially our alums from the 80s and 90s, whose email addresses were a mere gleam in future-Google’s eye.

YOU can help us! You have the technology! It takes only seconds to fill out this form. And, if you have a few more seconds, send this link to your alumni friends who haven’t yet joined our alumni group or liked us on Facebook.

Testimonial

What I see: “Listen to this!” one says.  They sit on the grass in pairs, the listener leans forward, as eager as the reader.  What I hear: silence of writing, pen on paper (or fingers on keyboard) in a room whose air is electric; pause to think and re-think; draft after draft.  What I remember: a letter from a parent, afterward--“She’s flying!”  YWW is a moment out of time, the past re-discovered as material for art, the future adumbrated--what it is to be a writer, to be dedicated, to form a living community--wisdom to last a life through.

Kenny Marotta

YWW Teaching Fiction Writer